Chuck Norris’s Code of Ethics – Good Stuff!

This is so totally off topic for this blog, but I was in a restaurant the other day in Louisiana and saw this posted on the wall.  I figured it would be your typical gimmicky stuff about Chuck Norris and his superhuman powers, but surprisingly it was some of the best “Code of Ethics” stuff I have read to date. See if you agree…….

Also, along the similar path of quality rules to live by, is the way we run our business at Presidio where I work.  These things have contributed remarkably to an overall positive culture:

(taken from http://www.ctiusa.com/about/coleman_rules.php)

Coleman Rules and Laws

Jeff Coleman’s Management Rules:

  • Don’t dictate – persuade.
  • Project a can-do attitude.
  • Delegate, and then don’t interfere. But be available to help.
  • Learn to accommodate a wide variety of personalities.
  • Don’t tolerate bickering, blame-throwing, or covering up – insist on harmonious teamwork.
  • Be tolerant of mistakes – up to a limit.
  • Be intolerant of incompetence.
  • Encourage constructive dissent.
  • Never miss an opportunity to pat someone on the back.
  • Be honest but gentle when appraising someone.
  • Give individuals a voice in their job assignments.
  • Make sure an assignment is understood and accepted.
  • Set high standards.
  • Be selective in hiring.
  • Be consistent.
  • Be open.
  • Don’t lose your temper.
  • Don’t ever take credit for others’ work.
  • Speak out.
  • Be inquisitive.
  • Write it down.
  • Don’t give the appearance of vacillating, but avoid the extreme of bullheadedness.
  • Be accurate – don’t exaggerate.
  • Keep your boss informed.
  • Don’t criticize one of your employees in front of others.
  • Cherish your personal integrity.
  • Keep your appearance neat.
  • Set a good example.
  • Take pride in everything you do.
  • Make money for the company and have fun doing it.
Jeff Coleman’s Laws:
  • No one is smart enough to be a dictator.
  • The only real power one has is the power of persuasion.
  • The less you know about something the simpler it seems.
  • Important decisions require at least one night’s sleep.
  • Decisions made without all the facts are guesses.
  • The most important thing a manager does is people picking.
  • Lies are hard to remember.
  • There is nothing more critical to true success than openness, honesty and integrity.
  • Those that don’t solicit and listen to advice are destined to be unsuccessful.
  • What is given cannot be taken away.
  • Meddling after responsibility is delegated and accepted provides a built-in excuse for failure.
  • Unwritten agreements are soon forgotten.
  • Time is not a good decision maker.
  • You must look successful to be successful.
  • Cash flow is more important than profit.
  • Grow or die.
  • The only people that are not making mistakes are those that are not doing anything.
  • Don’t bite off more than you can bite off.
  • The most important and most difficult trait to identify is the ability to get things done.
  • A manager with a full calendar every day isn’t delegating properly.
  • A full day spent in meetings is 40% wasted.
  • A pat on the back is the ultimate in cost effectiveness.
  • A manager that takes the credit for the work of the troops should be made a member of the troops.
  • A manager unwilling to take risks is destined for mediocrity.
  • Twenty percent of the people do eighty percent of the work.
  • People that feel comfortable in their job are more productive.
  • All contracts end.
  • The prepared bird gets the worm.
  • An unfilled position is better than one filled by the wrong person.
  • The killer of the bearer of bad news quickly joins the ranks of the uninformed.

If you think you can relate to any of the above, are willing to work as hard as the others around you, and hate losing, you should apply for one of our many open positions:

http://www.presidio.com/careers/index.htm

Not all positions are listed, for example we have several pre and post sales engineering positions open in our Atlanta, GA office!!

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